dharma writings

Below are some excerpts from the book Resting in Stillness: The Heart of the Buddhist Path, written by Jalü instructors Martin Jamyang Tenphel and Pema Düddul. Enjoy!

Making Tea

by Martin Jamyang Tenphel

Dharma practice is like making a cup of tea. We prepare by studying and contemplating the teachings, this is like putting tea and sugar in the cup. Then we pour boiling water into the cup and let it steep. The steeping process is equivalent to our Shamatha practice. The longer we let the tea steep, the stronger, more powerful, and more flavorful the tea will become. What do we need to do to help the tea steep? Nothing. We just rest, relax and wait for it to do its own thing. The same goes for Shamatha practice. The more we practice relaxing and resting in the stillness of Shamatha, the more we will experience the deep satisfying joy of our True Nature.

Elixir for All Ills

by Pema Düddul

The best meditation posture is stillness. In meditation and when at ease, make the stillness of the body your object. Focus awareness on the body. Feel the stillness of the body. Rest in the stillness of the body. Then simply be aware of the stillness of the body and remain in the now. If there is tension or pain in the body, simply reconnect with the stillness of the body. Do this again and again, always gently. Then be aware of the greater stillness deep within and gradually drop the object and the observer. Innate Awareness remains. Rest there.

The best mantra is silence. In meditation and when at ease, make the silence of speech your object. Focus awareness on silence. Listen to the silence, hear the silence. Then simply be aware of the silence. Rest in the silence and remain in the now. If there is noise, simply reconnect with the silence. Place your awareness on the silence beyond sound. Do this again and again, always gently. Then be aware of the greater silence deep within and gradually drop the object and the observer. Innate Awareness remains. Rest there.

The mind is best left alone in total relaxation. In meditation and when at ease, make the boundless spaciousness of mind your object. Feel the openness and spaciousness of the mind and heart. Rest in the spaciousness of mind and remain in the now. Then simply be aware of this spaciousness, luminous and open. If there is thought, simply reconnect with the spaciousness. Place your awareness on the spaciousness. Do this again and again, always gently. Then be aware of the greater spaciousness within and gradually drop the object and the observer. Innate Awareness remains. Rest there.

Rest in stillness. Rest in silence. Rest in spaciousness. In meditation and when at ease, rest in Innate Awareness.

This was composed at dawn on a Dakini Day after waking from a dream inspired by Padmasambhava’s "The Precious Golden Garland of Meditation" and Pema Wangyal Rinpoche’s Dzogchen teachings.

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